How Your Networking Skills Can Make or Break Your Music Career, by William Lee

“To succeed in a competitive industry, you have to eliminate the single word from your dictionary,” says William Lee. As a busy talent scout, Bydaway almost never has enough time for himself.

Society watchers argue that those who spot good talent should be admired as much as the talent itself. Music A&Rs are a special breed of people who seem to have magical tentacles that reach far and wide to shine a light on skills and talents that deserve our attention. These talent scouts go to great lengths to make the stars shine. Countless artists and celebrities owe their success and fame to them.


But how do these A&Rs manage to find such talents and make them shine? William Lee has been in the talent scouting business for several years and, according to him, the answer lies in networking. “Networking is to A&R music what the compass is to the browser,” he says. Here, William Lee shares three reasons why A&R leaders should invest their resources in networking.

Networking is proof of life.

Networking is the best way to stay on top of the minds of potential producers or budding talent. “In a big business like talent search, it’s easy to get lost. But by building a strong network, music A&Rs can secure their business and thereby attract more talent,” says William Lee.

Your network is your identity.

The people you choose to network with say a lot about you. “If we don’t consciously build a network for ourselves, we could find ourselves stuck in a bind with no contacts, no prospects, no invitations to events, and no reason to get out of bed in the morning,” says William Lee.

Either you build your network or you perish.

“To succeed in a competitive industry, you have to eliminate the word alone of your dictionary,” says William Lee. As a busy talent scout, Bydaway almost never has enough time for himself. He constantly attends parties, visits festival venues and meets new people. “The best way to build and expand your contacts is through these places,” he says. But how can William Lee attend these chic and prestigious evenings? “Through networking,” he replies. “Without the right kind of network, many potential opportunities can be missed.”

Therefore, it is obvious that to succeed in the highly competitive ecosystem that is the music industry, it is imperative to build a strong network. However, if this fact hadn’t occurred to you earlier for some reason, we hope William Lee’s insights have opened your eyes to the need for networking.